ABOUT ADVANCED
PROSTATE CANCER

It may be hard to learn that you or your loved one has advanced prostate cancer. Understanding your diagnosis and the treatment options available to you is an important first step.

This is not an actual patient.

KNOW YOUR DIAGNOSIS

When you were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer, your doctor may have said it was recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic. These are types of advanced prostate cancer, defined as follows:

Recurrent Advanced Prostate Cancer, Graphic

When prostate cancer has returned—following initial treatment such as radiation therapy or surgery—as detected by a rising PSA* level or positive biopsy/scan

Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer, Graphic

When prostate cancer has spread to tissues near the prostate

Metastatic Advanced Prostate Cancer, Graphic

When prostate cancer has spread far from the prostate to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes, bones, liver, or lungs

*PSA stands for prostate-specific antigen.

About Androgen Deprivation Therapy

Androgen deprivation therapy is a type of hormone therapy that lowers testosterone

Testosterone is the male hormone that can cause prostate cancer to grow and spread. That’s why advanced prostate cancer is often treated with hormone therapy, which helps lower the amount of testosterone the body makes. Your doctor may talk about a type of hormone therapy called ADT, or androgen deprivation therapy. Understand that ADTs have benefits and risks, so ask your doctor how they may affect you.

There are 2 types of ADT medicationsLHRH agonists and GnRH antagonists. LHRH agonists include injection treatments like Lupron Depot® (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) and Eligard® (leuprolide acetate for injectable suspension). GnRH antagonists include injection treatment Firmagon® (degarelix for injection) and the pill ORGOVYX.

Lupron Depot is a registered trademark of AbbVie Inc. Eligard is a registered trademark of the Tolmar group. Firmagon is a registered trademark of Ferring B.V.

The 2 types of ADT medications work in different ways to lower testosterone

LHRH Agonist Speech Bubble, Graphic

LHRH agonists work by initially activating certain hormone receptors

At the onset of therapy, LHRH agonists* activate certain hormone receptors—increasing testosterone levels before lowering them. This temporary surge in testosterone levels is known as a “testosterone flare.” The testosterone flare may worsen certain symptoms in some patients and require additional medicine to manage its effects. 

*LHRH stands for luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone.

GnRH Antagonist Speech Bubble, Graphic

GnRH antagonists work by directly inhibiting certain hormone receptors

By directly inhibiting (or blocking) certain hormone receptors, GnRH antagonists lower testosterone levels. This results in a decrease in testosterone levels without causing a testosterone flare.

GnRH stands for gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

How GnRH antagonists and LHRH agonists affect testosterone

How GnRH antagonists and LHRH agonists affect testosterone and testosterone flare How GnRH antagonists and LHRH agonists affect testosterone and testosterone flare

LHRH agonists cause testosterone levels to initially increase before they decrease. GnRH antagonists lower testosterone levels without causing a flare.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking ORGOVYX?

Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have any heart problems, including a condition called long QT syndrome.
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. ORGOVYX can harm your unborn baby and cause loss of pregnancy (miscarriage).
  • Have a partner who is pregnant or may become pregnant.
    • Males who have female partners who are able to become pregnant should use effective birth control (contraception) during treatment with ORGOVYX and for 2 weeks after the last dose of ORGOVYX.
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if ORGOVYX passes into your breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines or treatments you receive, including: prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Taking ORGOVYX with certain other medicines can affect how ORGOVYX works or may cause side effects.

You should not start or stop any medicine before you talk with your healthcare provider who prescribed ORGOVYX.

What are the possible side effects of ORGOVYX?

Serious side effects of ORGOVYX include:

  • Changes in the electrical activity of your heart (QT prolongation). Your healthcare provider may check your body salts (electrolytes) and the electrical activity of your heart during treatment with ORGOVYX. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any signs or symptoms of QT prolongation, including:
    • dizziness
    • fainting
    • feeling that your heart is pounding or racing (palpitations)
    • chest pain

Most common side effects of ORGOVYX include:

  • hot flushes
  • increased blood sugar levels
  • increased blood fat (triglyceride) levels
  • muscle and joint pain
  • decreased blood hemoglobin levels
  • increased liver enzymes
  • tiredness
  • constipation
  • diarrhea

ORGOVYX may cause other side effects including weight gain, decreased sex drive, and erectile function problems.

ORGOVYX may cause fertility problems in males, which may affect your ability to father children. Talk to your healthcare provider if this is a concern for you.

These are not all the possible side effects of ORGOVYX. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects or if you have a side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

You may report side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is ORGOVYX?

ORGOVYX is a prescription medicine used in adults for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

It is not known if ORGOVYX is safe or effective in females or children.

Please see full Prescribing Information and Patient Product Information for ORGOVYX.